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Visualizing Care

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How do we visualize care? In particular: How do we make care more visible, and how can we defamiliarize the naturalized and often common-sensical representations of care? And how can we develop a new vocabulary of care- visual, auditory, lexical, etc. - to help us to represent care in new ways?

To visit the website: https://visualizingcare.com 

Women and Work

Revaluing Care in the Global Economy, Visualizing Care Series presents artists Jennifer Ling Datchuk, Juniper Fleming and Nydia Blas in conversation with Jennifer Nash (Jean Fox O’Barr Professor Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies, Duke University) and Anna Storti (Assistant Professor Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies, Duke University).

The exhibit “Women and Work” moves beyond the dichotomy of the wage system and gender binarism.  It starts from the recognition that domestic, unwaged labor constitutes the prototypical form of various racialized and gendered modes of care work, which demand embodied affects and a surplus of performance as well as often an investment of time, expertise, and often-unseen labor. The 1970s International Wages for Housework Campaign emphasized that domestic labor is both invisible and undervalued while Arlie Russel Hochschild pointed to housework as a “second shift” performed mainly by women next to their formal job at the workplace. Focusing on the relationship among housework, Black motherhood, and sex work, we examine the performative aspects of care they require, and the gender and racial violence frequently involved. Jennifer Ling Datchuk, Juniper Fleming and Nydia Blas will help us to consider how mixed media contemporary art represents the exploitation of “women’s” labor and how it constitutes a way of liberating new social forces and political imaginaries.

Queering Communities of Care

Speakers: Devynn Emory and Gabriel Garcia Roman

Revaluing Care in the Global Economy, Visualizing Care Series presents artists Devynn Emory and Gabriel Garcia Roman in conversation with Pedro Lasch (Artist & Research Professor of Art, Duke University) and Peter Sigal (Professor of History and Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies, Duke University. How do we visualize care? In particular: How do we make care more visible, and how can we defamiliarize the naturalized and often common-sensical representations of care? And how can we develop a new vocabulary of care - visual, auditory, lexical, etc., - to help us to represent care in new ways?"Queering Communities of Care" launches a series of conversations and accompanying exhibits in which we invite artists, activists, and academics to help us explore these questions. Devynn Emory and Gabriel Garcia Roman will consider how we envision care beyond cis/heteronormative norms and how artistic practices help to trouble the problems of queering care and creating new networks and kinships.Online Visualizing Care Art Exhibit at https://visualizingcare.com

 

Artists in Exhibition: Anna Brody, Devynn Emory, Eleni Tomadaki, Ayan Felix, Ayling Zulema Dominguez, Luca Asta, Gabriel Garcia Roman

Curated by Lauren Henschel and Tania Rispoli